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Texas Transplant Institute

October 13, 2014 in News

Jerusalem (Marketwire October 19, 2009) Gamida Cell today announced the publication of an article which evaluates carlecortemcel-l, the generic name of which is known widely as StemEx, a therapy for blood cancers like leukemia and lymphoma. Article, Carlecortemcel-l, an ex vivo expanded umbilical cord blood cell graft for allogeneic transplantation, written by Dr. Ka Wah Chan and Dr. Demetrios Petropoulos, will be published in November 2009 issue of Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy. It is available online at ().

Dr. Chan is the Director of Hematology/Oncology and blood, and programmes of stem cell transplantation of bone marrow in the Texas Transplant Institute on the campus of Methodist Children’s Hospital in San Antonio, Texas. It is also the principal investigator of the ExCell study, which is currently evaluating StemEx. Dr. Petropoulos is hematologist Pediatric oncologist in Children’s Cancer Hospital at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas at Houston, Texas, where the phase I of the study of StemEx was carried out. In his article, Dr.

Chan and Dr. Petropoulos claim that previous results suggested that infusion of carlecortemcel-l could be related to favorable non-recurrence-related mortality rates. The former expansion alive of the blood cells from the umbilical cord (UCB, by its acronym in English) seems to be a logical approach to increase the availability of this source for stem cell transplantation hematopoietic (HSC, by its acronym in English). The research carried out in laboratories showed that what is essential to achieve success is to improve the proliferation of HSC without boosting differentiation. The manufacture of carlecortemcel-l represents a new methodology that meets this criterion. It’s the only product that has reached the stage of confirmation of clinical development. A single institutional study (phase I at M d Anderson Cancer Center study) suggested that the infusion These expanded cell could improve the outcome of transplants in patients of large size.


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